Researcher profiles

This guide explains the different kinds of profiles for researchers

Where to start?

  1. Use the tools that are most suitable to you and your discipline
  2. Maintain a few profiles well, rather than many poorly
  3. Go where your audience is

Scholarly profiles

ORCID is a persistent digital identifier for an individual researcher. It is a way to disambiguate researchers with similar names and is being increasingly used by publishers and databasesAt the minimum, researchers should make public their current employer. Researchers have control over their own ORCiD and what is publicly displayed. Victoria University of Wellington offers the ability to use our in-house research management system (Elements) to send your verified publications to your ORCID account, find out more: ORCID at VUW

Google Scholar  a free online scholarly database which allows you to see who is citing your articles, graph citations over time, and compute several citation metrics. You can add edit your profile, add manual entries and choose to make your profile public, so that it may appear in Google Scholar results when people search for your name.

Scopus Author Identifier Scopus authors are assigned a unique identifier. When an author has published several works in the database a profile is created, to which citation metrics and a variety of analyses are available. Scopus profiles offer a connection to ORCID with verified publication data. Access to Scopus profiles is limited to subscribers

ReseacherID, hosted on Publons, uses information from the Web of Science and other sources to generate a publicly accessible profile. It can include publications, peer reviews, and editor work. Citation metrics are supplied from the Web of Science and Altmetric information is supplied. 

Microsoft Academic automatically generates researcher profiles based on publications indexed by Bing. Researchers can claim their profiles to edit them.

Academic networks with researcher profiles

Any copies of research you choose to upload must comply with copyright law and with any licensing arrangements you have with your publishers, in some cases you may need to seek permission.